Execution: Getting Things Done

Execution is getting things done through people | Business Vitality

The Mysteries of Getting a Plan Done

Humans are great at two things where plans are concerned:
  1. Creating plans.
  2. Completing plans.

So what's going on?

Your people are seldom given the chance to do #2 before dealing with the next plans announced by those doing #1.

For example:
  • The new plans may conflict with the ones already in play.
  • Employees may have to spend a lot of time determining what the new plan is asking of them and how that factors into the processes they already use to get work done.
  • Changing how their department operates may require a lot of coordination on the input side with suppliers, vendors, and other internal departments as well as with internal and external customers on the output side.
  • Employees are also working hard to keep the current business afloat while making the requested changes.
  • Changes needed in company systems (finance, design, engineering, manufacturing, etc.) may not be keeping pace with what individuals must do to get work done under the new plan.

Book an appointment today with Business Vitality for a complimentary initial consultation.

Photo Credit: Top image: © Can Stock Photo / rogertb
Execution is getting things done through people | Business Vitality

The Mysteries of Getting a Plan Done

Humans are great at two things where plans are concerned:
  1. Creating plans.
  2. Completing plans.

So what's going on?

Your people are seldom given the chance to do #2 before dealing with the next plans announced by those doing #1.

For example:
  • The new plans may conflict with the ones already in play.
  • Employees may have to spend a lot of time determining what the new plan is asking of them and how that factors into the processes they already use to get work done.
  • Changing how their department operates may require a lot of coordination on the input side with suppliers, vendors, and other internal departments as well as with internal and external customers on the output side.
  • Employees are also working hard to keep the current business afloat while making the requested changes.
  • Changes needed in company systems (finance, design, engineering, manufacturing, etc.) may not be keeping pace with what individuals must do to get work done under the new plan.

Book an appointment today with Business Vitality for a complimentary initial consultation.

Photo Credit: Top image: © Can Stock Photo / rogertb
Execution is getting things done through people | Business Vitality

The Mysteries of Getting a Plan Done

Humans are great at two things where plans are concerned:
  1. Creating plans.
  2. Completing plans.

So what's going on?

Your people are seldom given the chance to do #2 before dealing with the next plans announced by those doing #1.

For example:
  • The new plans may conflict with the ones already in play.
  • Employees may have to spend a lot of time determining what the new plan is asking of them and how that factors into the processes they already use to get work done.
  • Changing how their department operates may require a lot of coordination on the input side with suppliers, vendors, and other internal departments as well as with internal and external customers on the output side.
  • Employees are also working hard to keep the current business afloat while making the requested changes.
  • Changes needed in company systems (finance, design, engineering, manufacturing, etc.) may not be keeping pace with what individuals must do to get work done under the new plan.

Book an appointment today with Business Vitality for a complimentary initial consultation.

Photo Credit: Top image: © Can Stock Photo / rogertb
Execution is getting things done through people | Business Vitality

The Mysteries of Getting a Plan Done

Humans are great at two things where plans are concerned:
  1. Creating plans.
  2. Completing plans.

So what's going on?

Your people are seldom given the chance to do #2 before dealing with the next plans announced by those doing #1.

For example:
  • The new plans may conflict with the ones already in play.
  • Employees may have to spend a lot of time determining what the new plan is asking of them and how that factors into the processes they already use to get work done.
  • Changing how their department operates may require a lot of coordination on the input side with suppliers, vendors, and other internal departments as well as with internal and external customers on the output side.
  • Employees are also working hard to keep the current business afloat while making the requested changes.
  • Changes needed in company systems (finance, design, engineering, manufacturing, etc.) may not be keeping pace with what individuals must do to get work done under the new plan.

Book an appointment today with Business Vitality for a complimentary initial consultation.

Photo Credit: Top image: © Can Stock Photo / rogertb